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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 34
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
into norfolk i think we'd all be in big trouble. >> brown: we assess the latest diplomatic moves to end syria's war, as secretary of state hillary clinton meets with russia's foreign minister. >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a program that aims to put students at low-achieving schools on a path to high school graduation. >> we're here to make things better. we're here to tutor kids. we're here to make sure that they stay on track. we are here to make sure that they graduate. we want to prepare them for high school. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: w
and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most pressure has faced from the west, certainly, in the almost two years this has been going on. i spoke before pa
making the wrong assumptions about syria's secular state. syrian state tv was in the room to film. none of the men had been in court. all have confessed to being in al qaeda-style groups. >> the main work is making explosive devices to plant. >> they produce the algerian passport of this person, who said he was also a french citizen. >> i decided to do something for the children of syria, for the families and the powerless. i decided to join the jihad rather than crying in front of my tv. >> he would not answer when i asked if he had been tortured. two said there were part of a front which the americans might name as a terrorist group. i cannot vouch for what they said. one repeated how well they had been looked after. but a trip to district 86 in damascus explains why the regime rests them. how whites -- allowites linda into a flat's wracked by a car bomb. his sister was one of 15 killed. she blames jihad this -- jihadists. diplomats say they do operate in syria as a small part of the armed rebellion. it is turning lives upside-down and ending them. it is impossible to say what is goin
weekend in egypt and there was news from syria. the pentagon announced that it will send patriot air defense missiles and 400 troops to turkey as part of a nato force. the aim is to protect turkish territory from potential missile attacks from syria. this comes as russia is backtracking on yesterday's statement that the opposition might actually win there. >> syrian forces bombing rebel positions on the turkish border earlier this year. the wounded brought across to the turkish side. syrian shells have landed on turkish territory itself also causing casualties. it could be vulnerable to serbian missile fire, turkey asked to protect against any such threat, we are deploying two patriot battalions here to turkey, along with the troops that are necessary to man those batteries. so that we can help turkey had a missile defense that they may very well need in dealing with threats that come out of syria. >> the american defense secretary announcing that the u.s. was joining germany and benevolence in providing patriot missiles. does this risk raising the stakes? >> i see these as predomina
to the bloodshed in syria. >> welcome to "bbc news." the grand old lady of parise celebrates herth birthday. >> who has been a good little boy then? >> and we find out how british troops are getting some festive cheer on the front line in afghanistan. >> hello again. we will begin in egypt because voters have officially backed a new constitution. in the past few hours the electoral commission has said that 63.8% voted yes to president morsi's proposals, those that have led to huge demonstrations in recent weeks. they say the document favors islamists and doesn't do enough to protect minorities. the united states has urged president morsi to build trust across egypt's political divides. given the muslim brotherhood's domination of the political scene, i asked our correspondent whether there are fears jipt may become a one-party state. >> that is what some of the people in the opposition are saying. it is not what other people in terms of the muslim brotherhood are saying and also what a number of egyptians who don't particularly sornte with one -- associate with one side or the more. what i think we
are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: we turn now to the conflict in syria. the country's neighbor, turkey, received long-sought-after defense help from nato today. the military coalition also expressed growing concerns about the assad regime's chemical weapons supply. in an all too familiar scenes of civil war, rockets blasted and fires flared overseer i can't today. far from the fighting in brussels, nato members approved turkey's request for patriot antimissile systems. they will defend against syrian shelling and rocket fire that land on the turkish side. the issue has taken on greater urgency. amid u.s. warnings that syria could be preparing to use chemical weapons against the rebels. >> the syrian stock piles of chemical weapons are a matter of great concerns. we know that syria possesses... we know they have the chemical weapons. it is a matter of urgency to ensure effective defense and protection of our ally turkey. >> woodruff: nato chief also warned of even stronger action if the syrian government crosses the chemical line. echoing monday's stateme
and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is being born, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action against the assad regime. foreign minister sergei lavrov: >> ( translated ): as the coalition has been recognized as the only legitimate representative, it seems that the united states decided to place all bets on the armed victory of this very national coalition. >> ifill: but no weapons have been promised, and a spokesman for the coalition said it needs real support. the u.s. has resisted sending arms, amid fears they might wind up in the hands of islamic extre
expensive. watch what we do. >> some perspective is important. they have seen the trauma of iraq and syria and they don't want chaos here. peace, andoking for up to look for. there are making problems with the government. we cannot afford problems in georgia. >> islamists promise a boycott. >> whoever wants to distance himself from this political process will not be included. we believe there is political reform and with the participation of everybody, we will broaden the leadership of the government and parliament. >> today's protest was pragmatically peaceful. these people know that they are in for a long struggle. >> they implement serious reform, running the risk of becoming the target of more widespread opposition. >> the stirrings of the arab spring being felt even in jordan. after more than a year and a half, there is no sign of the bloodshed ending in syria. the situation is reaching appalling heights of brutality and violence as government forces continued to crash -- clash with rebels. flights have been disrupted while telephone and internet services are also down. >> for months,
themselves for the sake of the country. >> the presidential palace looms over damascus. syria has to futures, a political deal between all sides or a long civil war. the most likely option right now. >> the fight for syria and the special section on the web site when they first started. some of the key moment across the last two years, go to bbc.com/news for more. the venezuelan president is undergoing surgery tonight. just hours after the prime minister was arrested by the military and forced to resign, the president has announced a new prime minister. they condemned the resignation, he had plans for an intervention. the u.k. government has been explaining his plan to allow same-sex marriage to be able to choose to conduct gay marriages, but the church of england which is against the plan has banned same-sex marriages. a disturbing report was released by the u.s. with the abuse of afghan women despite laws to protect them. one of the many problems the country faces. u.s. forces, that departure comes after a great sacrifice. one of the deadly as battles took place in 2009. it was there in ea
they are making progress. this comes amid reports over the last few days syria has fired scud missiles. >> in the words of one of its residents, welcome. where mounds of garbage rise and the destitute struggle to make a living. this is what has become of the ancient city. he has lost his home and his job, so every day he sifts through filth and stench so he can feed his children. life is really bad. there is no work and money. that is why i come here to collect and rubbish. this revolution was supposedly about a better future and a better tomorrow, and many residents still cling to that hope, and they believe the ongoing fighting, not just in the city but also in the countryside, is worth the struggle. a petrol now comes from a barrel at the side of the road. three times the price it was before the revolution. people queued for hours in the cold for bread, now 10 times more expensive and in short supply. the bombardment has subsided, but the suffering has not, and the fighting has moved elsewhere. we joined the rebels on an operation, running across open ground to avoid sniper fire. no
. a report. >> a small corner of the violence that is ravaging syria every day. this is the look at a town in the north. activists maimed seven women -- named seven women and two children they say died in the rubble after bombs were dropped by aircraft. there was even greater carnage further south. a town was attacked by rebels just a few days earlier, and activists said the regime struck back with jets, firing rockets at a bread line near the bakery. the regime said its army struck back at rebel fighters year, killing and injuring many of them. hardly a good moment for the peace envoy to be visiting damascus in search of a solution. whatever may have emerged in his talks with bashar al assad, he was not giving much away. >> i briefed the president about my meetings and talks with officials in the region and beyond and about the steps i think i necessary to help the syrian people come out of this crisis. the situation in syria remains worrying. we hope all parties will be able to find a solution that meets the aspirations and hopes of the syrian people. >> as the regime loses ever more gro
best november since 1973. in syria, the u.n. announced it is pulling out non-essential international staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was ful
. >> ifill: jeffrey brown examines new concerns over syria's chemical weapons capability and what, if anything, the u.s. can do about it. >> woodruff: from florida, hari sreenivasan has the story of endangered coral reefs. many of them dying because ocean temperatures are rising and the waters are more acidic. >> i remember seeing fields of elk horn coral that you couldn't see through it and you couldn't see beyond it and those same areas are dead you know 99% dead. ♪ >> ifill: and we close with a remembrance of jazz great dave brubeck who died today, one day shy of his 92nd birthday. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the nation's third- largest bank, citigroup, announced big job cuts as it continues to scale back in the wake of the financial crisis. the 11,000 employees to
minister sergei lavrov and the u.n. envoy for syria, lakhdar brahimi. >> we reviewed the very mr. brahimi had his own additional information to contribute about what he is hearing from sources inside syria and both minister lavrov and i committed to support a renewed push by brahimi and his team to work with all the stakeholders in syria to begin a political transition. meanwhile, rebels in syria made the damascus international airport an official battleground. they said it's a legitimate target and they urged civilians to stay clear. fighting near the airport and around the capital city has intensified in the past week. the latest amateur video showed street battles and a car set afire by a rocket attack. the exiled leader of hamas khaled meshaal entered gaza today for the first time. it was, in part, a show of defiance after the militant group's latest clash with israel. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: he crossed the border from egypt with tears in his eyes. the leader of hamas setting foot on palestinian territory for the firs
to violence especially in syria. >> may peace be for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which has not spared even the defenseless and reached innocent victims. >> ifill: pilgrims also flocked to the holy land for christmas mass in bethlehem's church of the nativity believe to be the site of the jesus' birth. to the east in iraq security was tight outside a church in baghdad. armed police searched everyone who arrived for the christmas day service in a bid to prevent attacks by islamic militants. but sectarian violence did erupt in nigeria for the third christmas in a row. gunmen killed at least five worshippers in the northeast where the radical islammist sect has staged repeated attacks. back in this country, memories of violence and loss were still fresh in newtown, connecticut. as townspeople filled trinity episcopal church on christmas eve. the pastor focused on the youngest worshippers ten days after a gunman killed 20 students and six adults at an elementary school. >> i just want to ask how you are. are you good? >> yeah. are you okay? are you doing
in syria last thursday. the first four members escaped unharmed on monday. a u.s. soldier accused of killing 16 afghans and injuring six others in march could face the death penalty if found guilty of murder. sgt bales faces 69 counts of murder and six counts of attempted murder as well as using drugs and alcohol and while deployed. the funerals continued in newto wn connecticut for the 26 victims killed in one of the worst mass shootings. there have been calls for greater gun control. today president obama announced his vice-president joe biden will lead a special task force looking into this. he released a special challenge. >> the fact this is complex and can no longer be an excuse for doing nothing. the fact we cannot prevent every act of violence does not mean we cannot steadily reduced violence and prevent the worst violence. >> the reaction to this tragedy will be a defining moment in the president's second term, but it is his record that won him the person of the year award. i spoke to the international editor in new york. does obama's new america include gun control do yo
in dealing with threats that come out of syria >> sreenivasan: a number of syrian shells have landed in turkish territory since the conflict in syria began in march of 2011. the environmental protection agency announced much tighter new rules for soot pollution today. the agency is limiting the amount allowed into the atmosphere from smokestacks, diesel trucks, and other sources of heavy pollution by 20%. the new standard goes into effect in 2014. residents in coastal california faced another day of flooding after a "king" tide pulled the pacific ocean farther ashore than normal. residents waded through streets filled with ankle-deep seawater. the tides are the result of an occasional astronomical alignment. tides are expected to reach 7.3 feet, a level that hasn't been seen since 2008. it was a down day for wall street as investors steered clear of stocks because of uncertainty over the fiscal cliff negotiations between congress and the white house. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 35 points to close at 13,135. the nasdaq fell nearly 21 points to close at 2,971. for t
60 such "insider" attacks this year. this was the first committed by a woman. in syria, the u.n. envoy to syria met with president bashar al-assad in damascus, but he gave no sign of progress toward halting the civil war. lakhdar brahimi spoke with assad as part of a two-day visit. brahimi was appointed envoy in september, but he's made little apparent headway. the latest visit came a day after opposition groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of violent protests over a gang rape. on sunday, police sprayed tear gas and water cannons after crowds began throwing stones and tipping over vehicles. the protesters demanded stronger punishments for crimes against women after a 23-year old woman was attacked on a public bus last week. the victim was thrown from the bus afterward. she remains in critical condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff tal
there. in syria, elite troops, along with tanks, battled to dislodge rebels from a key southern suburb of damascus. the area is within firing distance of major government sites in the capital. amateur video also showed the aftermath of what appeared to be air strikes in the northeastern suburb of douma. the attacks toppled buildings and sent civilians fleeing. celebrations began today as the new year, 2013, dawned around the globe. we have a report from richard pallot of independent television news. . >> here we go! >> reporter: a perfect summer's night ushering in 2013 in sydney. 7 tons of fireworks lighting up the famous harbor, the world's biggest and most expensive. >> an emotional commentary accompanied the scene in the north korea capitol pyongyang, reportedly the first ever fireworks display in this secretive country. >> in shanghai in china they sang an alternative version of auld lang syne. >> and in hong kong a more familiar one. ♪ auld lang syne ♪. >> a sum >> holman: a somber mood prevailed across india on new year's eve, as the country mourned the victim of a gang rape
, and libya or syria, is very clear. >> tom: so do these kinds of settlements make the money laundering business that much more unpalatable for public companies, like these big global banks? in other words, is it going to deter future dealings? >> the cynic in me says they may face pressure from shareholders to produce profits, and these are very profitable lines of business because they may involve some risks to individuals, so until people really pay attention, and the government shows how serious it is about enforcing its laws, i don't think we can conclude that this is over. >> tom: among those people, shareholders, but also costumers. what do you think these kinds of business practices say about the global banking business. >> i think we have giant costumers and small costumers. and most of the people involved at this level are giant costumers. they are states and american businesses and banks are not supposed to do business with. the europeans have similar attitudes about this. they are large corporations, and also some smaller companies that may or may not know the transactions t
grown to more than 500,000, all across the middle east. and inside syria, rebels captured a second major military base near the northern city of aleppo. new details have emerged from south africa on the health of former president nelson mandela. the government announced today that military doctors are treating him for a recurring lung infection. mandela is 94 years old. he's been hospitalized since saturday, but officials said he is responding to treatment. an investigation of paying pro football players for causing injuries took a sharp new turn today. the man appointed to hear appeals, former nfl commissioner paul tagliabue, voided the suspensions of four current and former new orleans saints. tagliabue said actions by team coaches and others had contaminated the case. he did agree that three of the players should be fined. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: cairo is the scene of mass rallies again tonight. demonstrators on both sides of the upcoming referendum are on the streets of the capital. their refrain was "bread, freedom and sharia" or islam
and the regime in syria. in his annual news conference, putin insisted his country is not protecting syrian president bashar assad. he urged assad to hold talks with the opposition, and negotiate an end to the bloodshed. >> ( translated ): we are not concerned about the fate of assad's regime. we understand what is going on there and that his family has been in power for 40 years. the changes are undoubtedly needed. we are worried about a different thing-- what next? we simply don't want the current opposition, having become the authorities, to start fighting the people who are the current authorities and become the opposition and we don't want this to go on forever. >> sreenivasan: on another matter, putin indicated he plans to sign a law banning u.s. adoptions of russian children. that move is retaliation for a new u.s. law aimed at punishing russian human rights violators. in u.s. economic news, growth during the summer quarter was better than first estimated. the commerce department reported today the economy grew at an annual rate of 3.1%. and on wall street today, the dow jones indust
to sing us a patriotic song, but she was soon overwhelmed by the general chant, "god, syria, bashar al-assad." asked tow draw a picture, this little artist came up with tanks and guns in the colors of the government flag. this is one of several shelters across damascus for people displaced by the fighting. >> ( translated ): the reason we're doing this is because we've seen what happens to syrians who have to leave the country for refugee camps. they're treated very badly. we don't want that to happen again. >> reporter: they may wear anoraks, but they claim anywhere here is welcome, whatever their political affiliation. perhaps, predictably, we couldn't find anyone here who said they support 9 rebels. one said, "any opportunity to go home would be lethal." >> ( translated ): they threaten me. if i go back, because i did not go to partly to mostly there, because i support the president. >> reporter: in a place where assad's senior and junior stare down, as families eat, one man still wouldn't speak openly, even in denouncing the rebels in a place like that. >> ( translated ): sometimes
, also called for swift international action to end the bloodshed in syria. in central asia, a military plane crashed early this morning in kazakhstan killing 27 people including the country's head of border security. the russian-made aircraft went down near a southern city. the dead also included seven crew members and 19 border guards. there was no immediate word on the cause of the crash but kazakhstan has been plagued by heavy winds and snow in recent weeks. the long-time actor charles durning died monday at his home in new york. he came to be known as the king of character actors. in a 50-year career that spanned broadway, the movies and television. along the way he earned two oscar nominations. one was for his role as the corrupt governor in the best little whorehouse in texas in 1992. in tootsies he played the suitor of dustin hoffman who was posing as a female soap opera star. now back to gwen. >> ifill: we turn to politics and part 2 of our lookality upcoming elections. last night i had talkd with newshour political editor christina bellantoni about how senate contests. tonight
like syria, egypt, britain, france, you had to hold together this coalition which was an usual coalition, so to speak. the administration jim baker got u.n. sanction for this operation. and it was just, we had no headquarters in the region. right now the central command has a headquarters in qatar. there was fog like that. the arab states didn't really want the americans there and on a permanent basis. so we had, all of this had to be moved first to saudi arabia not region first from the defensive operation and then in an offensive operation. so just months and months for this to even, just to prepare for this. >> and he was in charge of that. but now he was as we lewded to in the piece also criticized for making some strategic mistakes. what were those? >> well, there were well two goals primary goal its one was to evict the iraqi forces from kuwait which was done in the 100 hour ground war after six weeks of bombing, remember that. but the other one was to destroy saddam hussein's offensive powers, primarily his republican guard force. because the thinking was if you didn't d
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)